Detail View: C. Szwedzicki: The North American Indian Works: Harvest Festival

Work Record ID: 
291
Reproduction Record ID: 
291
Work Class: 
depictions
Work Type: 
print
Title: 
Les peintres indiens d'Amérique
Title Type: 
collective title
Title: 
American Indian painters
Title Type: 
alternate
Title: 
Harvest Festival
Title Type: 
constructed title
Measurements: 
9.10 x 14.90 in (23.11 x 37.85 cm) on sheet 12.50 x 17.60 in (31.75 x 44.70 cm)
Measurement Type: 
dimensions
Material: 
paper (fiber product)
Material Type: 
support
Technique: 
pochoir
Inscription: 
Below Image Right: Awa Tsireh
Inscription: 
Above Image Right: PLANCHE 55 [Plate Number]
Creator: 
Roybal, Alphonso, 1898-1955
Creator Dates: 
1898-1955
Creator Nationality: 
San Ildefonso
Creator Name Variant: 
Cattail Bird (Awa Tsireh)
Creator Type: 
personal name
Creator Role: 
painter
Date: 
1950
Location: 
San Ildefonso Pueblo (N.M.)
Repository: 
Archives and Rare Books Library, University Libraries, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio
Repository Type: 
current repository
ID Number: 
ARB RB Oversize E98.A7 J18 1950 Vol. 2
ID Number Type: 
call number
ID Number: 
55
ID Number Type: 
plate number
Style Period: 
Indian art--North America
Style Period: 
Pueblo (Native American style)
Culture: 
Native American
Culture: 
San Ildefonso
Subject: 
Face painting
Subject: 
Hairdressing
Subject: 
Moccasins
Subject: 
Dancers
Subject: 
Necklaces
Subject: 
Rugs
Subject: 
Hair ornaments
Subject: 
Silverwork
Subject: 
San Ildefonso dance
Subject: 
Puttees
Subject: 
Baskets
Subject: 
Mantas (Clothing)
Subject: 
Shawls
Subject: 
Corn
Subject: 
Squashes
Related Work: 
Jacobson, Oscar Brousse, 1882-1966. Les peintres indiens d'Amérique / [par] O. B. Jacobson [et] Jeanne d'Ucel. Nice (France): C. Szwedzicki, 1950.
Description: 
From: American Indian Painters, Vol. 2, p. 8: Awa Tsireh of San Ildefonso is a nephew of Crescencio Martinez, who was the first of the modern artists of San Ildefonso. He almost gave up art when his copies of Kiva frescoes angered the San Ildefonso people and he was severely punished. Helped and encouraged by white artists of Santa Fe, he acquired great success and became more famous than many other equally good Indian artists. His paintings have been exhibited all over the United States and abroad and are included in all discriminating Indian collections. Awa Tsireh's work has gone through three distinct periods showing three distinct styles. He began with a realistic manner. His subjects were then the ceremonial dances of his people. His figures were in pairs or groups, often arranged in serried rows or in circles. They were fairly small and very accurate. In some of them an effect of stateliness is achieved through the repetition of the same figure in the same movement. In the second period the artist is increasingly interested in decoration and symbolism. His figures are more stylized. He attempts a sort of conventionalized landscape and a combination of figures with purely decorative motives. To this period belongs, for instance, a magnificent and jolly work in which three Koshari are seen romping all over the arch of a stylized rainbow. Later Awa Tsireh shows his deepening concern with the spiritual world; his creative imagination enters the metaphysical field. He paints strange, haunting figures bordering on the supernatural and, somehow, reminiscent of the pottery designs of prehistoric Mimbres. Awa Tsireh is a very introspective person who speaks little and who can sit motionless as if asleep through a whole Indian dance performance. After the performance, without a moment's hesitation, he can paint this dance -- or rather the essence of this dance -- as distilled through his contemplative mind. "Harvest Festival" composes very nicely in a circle. It is somewhat sombre in color. Awa Tsireh has almost ceased producing. (Collection, University of Oklahoma) Map references: San Ildefonso Pueblo (N.M.)
Reproduction Rights Statement: 
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