Detail View: Archivision Base to Module 9: Arch of Constantine: Marcus Aurelius Relief Panels

Preferred Title: 
Arch of Constantine: Marcus Aurelius Relief Panels
Image View: 
East panels on the south flank, the emperor sacrificing pig, sheep and bull (suovetaurilia)
Creator: 
unknown (Ancient Roman)
Location: 
site: Rome, Lazio, Italy
Location Note: 
between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill
GPS: 
+41.889722+12.490833
Date: 
312-315 (alteration); ca. 176 (creation)
Cultural Context: 
Ancient Roman
Style Period: 
Imperial (Roman)
Work Type 1: 
relief (sculpture)
Classification: 
sculpture
Material: 
marble
Technique: 
carving (processes)
Relation Work: 
part of Arch of Constantine
Subjects: 
architecture; military or war; rulers and leaders; Marcus Aurelius, Emperor of Rome, 121-180; spolia; architectural re-use
Description: 
Flanking the inscription on both sides of the attic are pairs of relief panels above the minor archways, being eight total. They were taken from an unknown monument erected in honour of Marcus Aurelius, and show (north side, left to right) the emperor's return to Rome after the campaign (adventus), the emperor leaving the city and saluted by a personification of the Via Flaminia, the emperor distributing money among the people (largitio), the emperor interrogating a German prisoner, (south side, left to right) a captured enemy chieftain led before the emperor, a similar scene with other prisoners, the emperor speaking to the troops (adlocutio), and the emperor sacrificing pig, sheep and bull (suovetaurilia). Together with three panels now in the Capitoline Museum, the reliefs were probably taken from a triumphal monument commemorating Marcus Aurelius' war against the Marcomanni and the Sarmatians from 169- 175, which ended with his triumphant return in 176. (Source: Wikipedia; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mai
Collection: 
Archivision Addition Module Five
Identifier: 
1A3-R-R-AC-5-F1
Rights: 
© Scott Gilchrist, Archivision, Inc.