Media Information

 
 
 
Collection name:
Alice Weston Great Houses
Record:
Work Record ID:
1194
Reproduction Record ID:
1194
Work Class:
Architecture
Work Type:
house
Title:
Goshorn House
Title Type:
preferred
Title:
3540 Clifton Avenue
Title Type:
descriptive
Title:
Glen Terrace
Title Type:
alternate
Creator:
McLaughlin, James W., 1834-1923
Creator Dates:
1834-1923
Creator Nationality:
American
Creator Type:
personal
Creator Role:
architect
Date:
1890
Date Type:
creation
Location:
Cincinnati (Ohio)
Location Type:
site
Location:
3540 Clifton Avenue, Clifton (Cincinnati, Ohio)
Style Period:
Richardsonian Romanesque
Culture:
American
Subject:
National Register of Historic Places
Subject:
oriel windows
Subject:
Clifton (Cincinnati, Ohio)
Subject:
turrets (towers)
Subject:
engaged columns
Subject:
balconies
Subject:
gambrel roofs
Subject:
paneling
Description:
"In contrast to the Hannafords' relatively conventional approach, the large, bold stone house designed by James W. McLaughlin for Sir Alfred Traber Goshorn (1833-1902) in 1890 represents McLaughlin's distinctive 'take' on the Richardsonian Romanesque style. Like McLaughlin's Sol P. Kineon-John Uri Lloyd, Jr., House, which was built in 1887-88 nearby on Clifton Avenue at Lafayette Avenue, the Goshorn House almost seems to revel in the awkwardness of its monumental geometry. McLaughlin often juxtaposes them without mediation, in contrast to the flowing continuities of Richardson's later works." "Originally, as one approached from the south from downtown, the view of the Goshorn House was dominated by a huge gambrel-roofed profile above a single-story parlor wing. In 1899 an octagonal second-story art gallery, also by McLaughlin, was added over the parlor. A circular staircase at the end of the living room, as shown opposite, rises into octagonal upper vestibule that leads to the gallery. When constructed, the gallery had only skylights, like that at 'Scarlet Oaks,' also in Clifton. On the front of the Goshorn House, beside a turreted oriel that ought to contain the staircase but perversely does not, a handsome glass marquee leads to a porch (its broad openings now glassed in) with a Neo-Classical mosaic-tile floor. The interior has generous spaces but rather understated Colonial Revival panelling and moldings."
Information Source:
Walter E. Langsam. Great Houses of the Queen City. Cincinnati: Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal and Cincinnati Historical Society, 1997. 80-81.
Reproduction Creator:
Weston, Alice, 1926
Reproduction View:
Library
Reproduction View Type:
interior view
Reproduction Information Source:
Photograph collection of Cincinnati Museum Center-Cincinnati Historical Society Library
Reproduction Rights Statement:
These images are for non-profit use educational use. Publication, commercial use, or reproduction of material in physical or digital form requires prior written permission from the copyright holder.

Glen Terrace