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13. Salal (Gaultheria shallon)
Collected: 1806 Jan 20 - Fort Clatsop, Oregon
Salal
Salal
Margaret H. Fulford Herbarium
University of Cincinnati
Salal
Salal
Photographer: Victor Soukup
Salal
Salal
Pursh, Frederick. Flora Americae Septentrionalis.
London: White, Cochrane, & Co. 1814.
Archives & Rare Books Department

Description: "The Shallon is the production of a shrub which I have heretofore taken to be a species of loral and mentioned as abounding in this neighbourhood and that the Elk fed much on it's leaves. It generally rises to the hight of 3 feet but not unusually attains to that of 5 feet. It grows very thick and is from the size of a goos quill to that of a man's thumb, celindric, the bark of the older or larger part of the stock is of a redish brown colour while that of the younger branches and succulent shoots are red where most exposed to the sun and green elsewhere." [Lewis. 1806 Feb 8] (Thwaites. 1904. Vol. 4, Part 1, p. 52.)

Journal Entry 1806 Jan 20: "This morning we sent out two parties of hunters in different directions. Soon after we were visited by two Clatsopmen and a woman, who brought several articles to trade…." (Lewis. 1814. Vol. 2, p. 125.)

Notes: Salal is related to rhododendron. It is not as tall, but forms impenetrable thickets. The berries are edible and Native Americans used the leaves for tea. Salal contains methyl salicylate, a mild painkiller.