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3. Lewis's Monkey Flower (Mimulus lewisii)
Collected: 1805 Aug 12, 15 or 26 - Lemhi Pass, Montana and Idaho
Lewis's Monkey Flower
Lewis's Monkey Flower
Margaret H. Fulford Herbarium
University of Cincinnati
Lewis's Monkey Flower
Lewis's Monkey Flower
Pursh, Frederick. Flora Americae Septentrionalis.
London: White, Cochrane & Co. 1814.
Archives & Rare Books Department
 
Lewis's Monkey Flower
Lewis's Monkey Flower
Photographer: Victor Soukup
Lewis's Monkey Flower
Lewis's Monkey Flower
Photographer: Victor Soukup

Journal Entry 1805 Aug 12: "…the stream gradually became smaller, till after going two miles it had so greatly diminished in width that one of the men in a fit of enthusiasm, with one foot on each side of the river, thanked God that he had lived to bestride the Missouri." (Lewis. 1814. Vol. 1, p. 359.)

Journal Entry 1805 Aug 15: "When they arrived at the spring on the side of the mountain where the party had encamped on the 12th, the chief insisted on halting to let the horses graze; to which captain Lewis assented and smoked with them. They are excessively fond of the pipe, in which however they are not able to indulge much as they do not cultivate tobacco themselves, and their rugged country affords them but few articles to exchange for it. Here they remained for about an hour, and on setting out, by engaging to pay four of the party, captain Lewis obtained permission for himself and each of his men to ride behind an Indian; but he soon found riding without stirrups more tiresome than walking, and therefore dismounted, making the Indian carry his pack. About sunset they reached the upper part of the level valley in the cove through which he had passed, and which they now called Shoshonee cove." (Lewis. 1814. Vol. 1, p. 373.)

Journal Entry 1805 Aug 26: "The morning was excessively cold, and the ice in our vessels was nearly a quarter of an inch in thickness: we set out at sunrise, and soon reached the fountain of the Missouri, where we halted for a few minutes, and then crossing the dividing ridge reached the fine spring where captain Lewis had slept on the 12th in his first excursion to the Shoshonee camp. The grass on the hill sides is perfectly dry and parched by the sun, but near the spring was a fine green grass: we therefore halted for dinner and turned our horses to graze." (Lewis. 1814. Vol. 1, pp. 415-416.)